This website requires Javascript for optimum viewing purposes. Please enable javascript in your browser.


Dominique Falla

Dominique
Falla

artist

Toast Creative was lucky enough to work with Dominique on one of our property development projects, The Loom Apartments last year. Dominique brought her tactile typography to the table, creating a custom art piece that echoed the building’s history as a textiles mill. Dominique has set her skills to a huge list of other brands and publications including Google, Bing, Columbia Law School, Penguin Books, WIRED Magazine and Woolworths. We love her creative style and ability to channel a brief and inspiration into refined yet tactile works.

  • Feature image of Dominique Falla
  • Feature image of Dominique Falla
  • Feature image of Dominique Falla
  • Feature image of Dominique Falla
  • Feature image of Dominique Falla
  • Feature image of Dominique Falla
  • Feature image of Dominique Falla

08-06-2016

On the wall

Visual insights with creative artist Dominique Falla

Question number 1 Favourite pair of shoes
Question number 2 View from your window
Question number 3 Something you can't live without
Question number 4 Most loved object in your house
Question number 5 Something that inspires you
Question number 6 A selfie for the wall
Question number 7 What represents your work at present
Question number 8 Favourite food this week
Question number 9 Texture, colour, or both
Question number 10 Screensaver on your phone
The long story

01.When did you realise you were creative?

As a child, I was very “crafty”. I was always making things, and working on projects. I was an only child, so I wonder if that had anything to do with my ability to entertain myself? Whilst all my friends were building forts and attacking their brothers, I was entertaining myself in front of Play School or Take Hart and my grandmother bought me a “Big Book of Craft” one Christmas and I worked my way through that, so I learnt to sew, macramé, glue and construct from there. It’s been so much fun to revisit all those techniques with a graphic designer’s sensibility. I also enjoy combing the digital “look” of something, with the “one-off” appeal of making something by hand.

02.What do you currently do for work?

I am a graphic designer/artist who works in a variety of tactile mediums and combines digital creation with analogue output for exhibition and publication. I create pieces known as “tactile typography”. I also convene the graphic design program at Griffith University on Queensland’s Gold Coast.

03.Have you always worked in this field?

Initially I trained as a graphic designer and I ran a design and illustration studio in Melbourne for many years, but after moving north with my husband, I changed career paths and became an academic. I now convene the design program at Griffith University on the Gold Coast. It is through my doctoral study that I really began to focus on tactile typography. I have used a Mac computer for over 20 years and I guess I became tired of producing web designs and digital illustrations that nobody gets to touch, and so I started combining my crafts from my childhood, with my computer and typographic design skills.

04.What inspires you the most at present?

Stefan Sagmeister inspires me because he is able to make a living by being incredibly creative. He is a designer, but it is almost like his customers are his art patrons, rather than design clients. They finance his creative play and I think that is so great.

05.Your favourite project to date?

I thoroughly enjoyed the project for Google. They flew my husband and myself to Arizona and we worked for several days alongside the Zeitgeist crew to install a large-scale piece in the lobby of the hotel. I enjoyed the collaboration, the scale, and the travel. I also really loved being able to nip off to Vegas and the Grand Canyon for a few days afterwards.

06.Talk us through an average work day?

My favourite place to work is on the couch. I love sewing in front of the TV, but as my pieces have got larger and involve more trips to the hardware store, I have to find other places to work. The kitchen island bench often gets taken over when I am hammering and I have access to a workshop at the university where I work. If I have an exhibition coming up, I will go and spend some serious thinking time in a coffee shop with a notebook, usually in the morning. The hammering usually takes place during the day, because of the noise, and sewing pieces usually at night. I am also currently writing a book on creativity so I spend most mornings in a coffee shop laying down 600 words before the rest of the day takes over.

07.Who are your biggest style influences?

I love the CMYK embroidery of Evelin Kasikov and the work of Maricor Maricar. Anna Garforth does some great stuff with recycling and reclaimed materials that interests me for future projects. Gabriel Dawe does some amazing colour thread installations and Marian Bantjes is an all-round design inspiration.

My favorite artist however, is a new discovery to me, Gordon Young. He does public typographic sculptures in partnership with Why Not Associates, who are one of my favorite design agencies, and every piece I’ve seen of his just blows my mind. The scale of his work scares me though. I don’t think I could ever do multi-million dollar projects like the Comedy Carpet in Blackpool, but his work excites me so much.

08.Your idea of a dream project?

Anything which involves travel, collaboration with a great creative team and a beautiful outcome. If my husband can come as well and we can make a holiday out of it, then all the better.

09.The biggest challenge in your career?

Saying no. I am always overcommitted and overstretched. I have a terrible habit of saying yes to everything, but I am really working on that.

10.What are you looking forward to?

More travel to work on projects, and my book Creativity Fitness being released.

The long story

01.When did you realise you were creative?

As a child, I was very “crafty”. I was always making things, and working on projects. I was an only child, so I wonder if that had anything to do with my ability to entertain myself? Whilst all my friends were building forts and attacking their brothers, I was entertaining myself in front of Play School or Take Hart and my grandmother bought me a “Big Book of Craft” one Christmas and I worked my way through that, so I learnt to sew, macramé, glue and construct from there. It’s been so much fun to revisit all those techniques with a graphic designer’s sensibility. I also enjoy combing the digital “look” of something, with the “one-off” appeal of making something by hand.

02.What do you currently do for work?

I am a graphic designer/artist who works in a variety of tactile mediums and combines digital creation with analogue output for exhibition and publication. I create pieces known as “tactile typography”. I also convene the graphic design program at Griffith University on Queensland’s Gold Coast.

03.Have you always worked in this field?

Initially I trained as a graphic designer and I ran a design and illustration studio in Melbourne for many years, but after moving north with my husband, I changed career paths and became an academic. I now convene the design program at Griffith University on the Gold Coast. It is through my doctoral study that I really began to focus on tactile typography. I have used a Mac computer for over 20 years and I guess I became tired of producing web designs and digital illustrations that nobody gets to touch, and so I started combining my crafts from my childhood, with my computer and typographic design skills.

04.What inspires you the most at present?

Stefan Sagmeister inspires me because he is able to make a living by being incredibly creative. He is a designer, but it is almost like his customers are his art patrons, rather than design clients. They finance his creative play and I think that is so great.

05.Your favourite project to date?

I thoroughly enjoyed the project for Google. They flew my husband and myself to Arizona and we worked for several days alongside the Zeitgeist crew to install a large-scale piece in the lobby of the hotel. I enjoyed the collaboration, the scale, and the travel. I also really loved being able to nip off to Vegas and the Grand Canyon for a few days afterwards.

06.Talk us through an average work day?

My favourite place to work is on the couch. I love sewing in front of the TV, but as my pieces have got larger and involve more trips to the hardware store, I have to find other places to work. The kitchen island bench often gets taken over when I am hammering and I have access to a workshop at the university where I work. If I have an exhibition coming up, I will go and spend some serious thinking time in a coffee shop with a notebook, usually in the morning. The hammering usually takes place during the day, because of the noise, and sewing pieces usually at night. I am also currently writing a book on creativity so I spend most mornings in a coffee shop laying down 600 words before the rest of the day takes over.

07.Who are your biggest style influences?

I love the CMYK embroidery of Evelin Kasikov and the work of Maricor Maricar. Anna Garforth does some great stuff with recycling and reclaimed materials that interests me for future projects. Gabriel Dawe does some amazing colour thread installations and Marian Bantjes is an all-round design inspiration.

My favorite artist however, is a new discovery to me, Gordon Young. He does public typographic sculptures in partnership with Why Not Associates, who are one of my favorite design agencies, and every piece I’ve seen of his just blows my mind. The scale of his work scares me though. I don’t think I could ever do multi-million dollar projects like the Comedy Carpet in Blackpool, but his work excites me so much.

08.Your idea of a dream project?

Anything which involves travel, collaboration with a great creative team and a beautiful outcome. If my husband can come as well and we can make a holiday out of it, then all the better.

09.The biggest challenge in your career?

Saying no. I am always overcommitted and overstretched. I have a terrible habit of saying yes to everything, but I am really working on that.

10.What are you looking forward to?

More travel to work on projects, and my book Creativity Fitness being released.

Toast Talks

Join us for exclusive evenings of storytelling and visual insight with some talented creative guests

  • Coming Soon
Top